Civil rights is our focus.  People first.

 

Our name is Disability Justice.  We promote and advocate for the civil rights of people like us -- people with disabilities.

 

The Americans with Disabilities Act is

  • not medical services,

  • not social services,

  • not special treatment

 

 

The ADA is civil rights.  Plain and simple.

 

"Disability rights" are not special rights.  Disability rights are the same rights guaranteed to everyone by the  Constitution.

 

Every person has the right to be fully part of everyday life:

learning, commerce, civic, recreation, family and friends, independence.

 

President George H. W. Bush said when signing the Americans with Disabilities Act in 1990:

 

"Together, we must remove the physical barriers we have created and the social barriers that we have accepted.

For ours will never be a truly prosperous nation until all within it prosper."

The Americans with Disabilities Act applies to everyone.

Anyone can join the club any time

 

temporary disability is a sports injury; postpartum depression

long term disability is scoliosis; a work injury causing on-going back pain

visible disability is joint arthritis requiring a cane for walking; COPD requiring oxygen

invisible disability is PTSD; nerve damage in legs

future disability - as we age, we are likely to acquire a disability

 

 

Disability is a normal part of life.

Society works best when inclusion is normal. 

What are barriers?

 

Physical barriers are steps.   Someone with a broken leg who uses crutches can't use stairs.  Restaurants, workplaces, stores, churches, government offices, schools often have no alternative like a ramp.

 

Society's barriers are refusing to hire people with physical disabilities no matter what their education and skills.   Too often people with disabilities are treated as problems not people.  Blaming shootings on "mental health issues" ignores reality.   This stigmatizes people with mental health problems.

 

Congress left it up to us

Congress intended civil rights. 

It's 30 years since the ADA became law. 

No more waiting for equality. 

The time is now. 

Take a look at our blog entries.  We have ideas on how to increase public awareness of civil rights.  People will do the right thing when they understand.